A PARENT TURNS 36 (THAT’S NOT OLD!): I WHO HAVE DIED AM ALIVE AGAIN TODAY

All things birth-day, thinking of Ta-Nehesi Coates’ Between the World and Me, A Parent’s Thoughts (coming soon to a neighborhood near you), and tomorrow, the first day of school, a new year, a new life: WHAT DO YOU WANT FOR OUR WORLD, WHAT WOULD YOUR LETTER BE? WHAT WOULD YOU TEACH, WHAT WOULD YOU HAVE BE LEARNED? And so, launched by thoughts of T.S. Eliot’s birthday, beginnings . . . beginnings . . .
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THE ARCHITECTURE OF ANGUISH (“Rooms of Fire”) THINK OF DANTE: WHAT A PROF TELLS A STUDENT WHO PANICS IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT: WHAT IT ALL COMES DOWN TO, OR UP TO

Dante, Shakespeare, Elizabeth Bishop, T.S. Eliot, Rumi, Shakespeare, e.e. cummings, Thoreau, Ta-Nehesi Coates’ Between the World and Me, Alain de Botton’s The Architecture of Happiness, and Terry Eagleton’s The Meaning of Life, to the music of Simon and Garfunkle, Stevie Nicks, Aaron Hall, Jacques Brel, musicals Carousel, Mondo Cane, and My Fair Lady, Beatles:

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DROP THE MERE, KISS THE JOY AS IT FLIES, AND YOU WILL LIVE IN ETERNITY’S SUNRISE

Have fun my dear, my dear, have fun–Hafiz

I have conversed with the spiritual Sun. I saw him on Primrose Hill—William Blake

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WHEN THE NEWS IS FALLING DOWN ALL AROUND WHAT GOOD IS LEFT IN THE DAY — Poetry’s Left Overs When We Are Over It

You’ve seen the headlines–Let’s start, O Poetry Flight of Listeners, with a way to begin the morning anew, morning being whenever you are awake, and now is a good time—from Psalms, This is the day the Lord has made, let us rejoice, and be glad in it, Psalms 118, I’m Professor Barbara Mossberg for our Poetry Slow Down on radiomonterey.com, with Producer Zappa Johns, who does our podcast, at barbaramossberg.com, with the news we need, the news we heed, the news without which men die miserably every day 

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Headlines, Heartlines, Love Lines: Poets on the Front Lines When Life is on the Line

WHEN IN THE MIDDLE OF OUR LIFE WE FIND OURSELVES IN A DARK WOOD WHERE THE DIRECT WAY IS LOST—HOW “WILD, HARSH AND INPENETRABLE”—“SCARCELY LESS BITTER THAN DEATH”—“THINKING OF IT RECREATES THE FEAR”—(Dante, The Inferno), HOW AND WHY TO GO ON:
When Fear Blocks Our Way Love is the Answer

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Professor Barbara Mossberg’s THE ROAD TO HAMILTON, PART TWO GALL, GUTS, NERVE, AND GLORY

A Show for Pre (and Ali) On the way to the phenomenon of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s tour de force on Alexander Hamilton, the power of books and poetry to excite and move our world, Viet Tang Nwhen (Viet Thanh Nguyen)’s The Sympathizer (look for it as the next musical blockbuster on Broadway, I’m just sayin), we slow down to consider lyrical feats and feet: THE POETRY OF INDIGESTION, PAIN, AND GLORIOUS PHYSICAL DESIRE TO RUN AND TO WIN (AND EVEN LOSE) IN LANES AND LINES WITH POETIC FEET

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WE THE PEOPLE: THE ROAD TO HAMILTON, PART ONE

I Found Myself in the Stories He Told—Richard Rodriquez, on William Saroyan

WE THE PEOPLE: THE ROAD TO HAMILTON, PART ONE, live from Broadway-New York and Helsinki, the 40th Fulbright Anniversary and the Maple Leaf and Eagle Conference on North American Studies

The Nation of Nobody: The Crisis of Belonging in Alien-Nation, or, Outsiders as the Elect(ed) in American Cultural History (and that includes Emily Dickinson, and you).

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