WINTER IS OVER MY LOVES, COME AWAY FROM YOUR HOLLOWS AND HOLES: THE RETURN OF THE MAN WITH THE MARMELADE HAT, NANCY WILLARD’S A VISIT TO WILLIAM BLAKE’S INN.

FOR MOLES AND HEDGEHOGS AND BADGERS AND BALLOON MEN AND ALL EMERGENT IMPROBABLE WILD CHARACTERS IN OUR LIVES, our show today is about love, improbable love, and life improbably emergent in just Spring. It all begins in Brooklyn with Death of a Salesman, Willy Loman’s Everyman fluted mourning of lost gardens (are we going to get out of those woods—those winds?—not likely, not in the near future, and we’ll hear Edgar Arlington Robinson with Broken Flutes of Arcady), our oldest consciousness perhaps marrying grief over lost gardens and the wood-wind flute. 40,000 years ago flutes are made, from bones of bear and swan, vulture, mammoth and crane, found from Germany to China as humanity evolves from Neanderthals. We hear poets from every land and time on the topic of flutes: poetry and flutes are the original Mac and cheese, soup and sandwich combo. Aristotle and King Frederick of Prussia warn against both (mothers, don’t let your children grow up to be flute players and poets) and so does Lutheran Guide Garrison Keillor, but Goethe (not to mention Mozart) says get over it, people, the flute and poetry are here to stay. Hear, hear! says Kahlil Gibran, Genesis, and Rumi.

Our opening line-up, e.e. cummings’s “in just Spring,” and Nancy Willard’s “The Man in the Marmelade Hat,” and we celebrate the 40th anniversary of a certain couple, whose beginnings are the exchange of Kenneth Graham, Wind in the Willows and Knut Hamsun’s Pan, and results in a wedding in the woods and a dog named Moley. We’ll hear lots about Pan-playing flutes and flute-playing Pans, (and more on that subject and pots and pans to follow). Speaking of spring-cleaning and hearing Pan’s Piper of Dawn, we’ll hear some poems about that gloriously toiling mole and origin of a labour of moles, (stay tuned for the origin of Holey Moley in subsequent shows), notes of Judith Kitchen, “Catching the Moles,” Christina Rossetti, “A Handy Mole,” Mary Oliver, “The Moles,” and William Stafford’s “Starting With Little Things,” which we will return to in next week’s show from Oregon, and your host’s own “Next Stop: Klamath Falls,” and continuation of the theme of late winter, early spring, emergent love, and certain improbabilities. Let’s slow down as the ice begins to melt . . . do you hear some music? Or is that the wind . . . love and live to you, The Poetry Slow Down, KRXA 540AM

© Barbara Mossberg 2011

GET UP! ROUSED TO RESILIENCE, AS WE CONTINUE THE ART AND SCIENCE OF HOW TO GET OURSELVES BACK TO THE GARDEN

in midst and mists of epic storms, Gerard Manley Hopkins, with Charles Tripi’s “Get Up,” (W.E. Henley’s “Invictus,” Tennyson’s “Ulysses”), and paean “Imaginary Brooklyn,” W.S. Merwin’s “The Blind Seer of Ambon” and more, Karen Bryant (responding to John Muir) as vinegar and piss polecat warrior on lost gardens, Emily Dickinson’s “a little madness,” poems from Sweeping Beauty, poets on housework, and notes of Jacques Brel (“no love, you’re not alone, come on, now!”), Joan Baez singing Bob Dylan (“any day now”), San Cooke (“been a long time comin, a change is gonna come”). And don’t forget the “Man in the Marmelade Hat,” thank you Nancy Willard, A Visit to William Blake’s Inn, a rousing way to say, “winter is over my loves, come away from your hollows and holes.”

To be continued in our March series on getting ourselves back to the garden. Look for more Brooklyn hope and wisdom in Miss Rumphius, catastrophes and resilience wisdom for children in Winnie the Pooh and Frederick, garden music in Wind in the Willows, and other ways poetry saves the day, and poetry and music from the Garden State, yes, everyone you’re thinking of . . . write me at bmossberg@csumb.edu.

In our show today, we consider signs of hope and the bravery to face momentous forces on literal and mental land and sea, poetry as part of the earth’s rhythms . . . we March forward, this first day of spring and we’ll talk about spring cleaning and spring training (in sonnets, that is) and sweeping and renewal and words’ healing and world’s healing. Carrying on. Resilience. And more works from our continuing theme of We’ve Got to Get Ourselves Back to the Garden. . . Every day in the headline news, we are seeing more and more reason to get under the covers, if we are so lucky as to have covers to get under—for a poetry workshop I gave yesterday in Pacific Grove, in which I asked people at the outset to write down a problem that afflicts us, and a worry which demoralizes us, we did a sonnet as an exercise in turning our minds around about something vexing, and the group chose the topic of insomnia–that makes sense, right, and the challenge was to come up with that redemptive couplet at the end which FLIPS our despair and helplessness and hopelessness, I’m talking about serious resilience here, at The Poetry Slow Down.

Problem Solving Through Poetry

Title: Problem Solving Through Poetry
Location: The Pacific Grove Library 550 Central Ave, Pacific Grove California
Description: Poetry Workshop at the Pacific Grove Library
Saturday, March 19, from 9:00 to 12 noon
Problem Solving Through Poetry

Presented by Dr. Barbara Mossberg,
Pacific Grove’s Poet in Residence

From ancient minds to Nobel-prize high-minded physics, astronauts to engineers, poetry has been a way to work things out, to make order of chaos, beauty of darkness, solace of pain, wisdom of the mess of feelings and ideas that blur our hassled, hectic everyday lives. This workshop is an introduction to the practical nature of poetry. We will raise our pens to the proposition that poetry can bring to the everyday mind one’s own remarkable capacity for problem-solving and coming up with new ways of thinking and creative solutions.

Dr. Mossberg has been a proponent of poetry and literature all her life in roles ranging from President of Goddard College, to the U.S. Scholar in Residence for the U. S. State Department as a cultural diplomat representing American culture, to Fulbright scholar, to senior scholar for the American Council on Education, to keynote speaker around the world on the humanities and creativity for leadership. Catch her weekly radio show, The Poetry Slow Down, on radio station, KRXA 540AM, (barbaramossberg.com).

Tea and pastries will be served.


The $15 workshop fee supports the Pacific Grove Poet in Residence fund.

Seating is limited, call Lisa Maddalena at 649-5760 or email LMaddale@pacificgrove.lib.ca.us for reservations.

The Pacific Grove Library is located at 550 Central Ave, Pacific Grove
Start Time: 09:00
Date: 2011-03-19
End Time: 12:00

Problem Solving Through Poetry

Title: Problem Solving Through Poetry
Location: The Pacific Grove Library 550 Central Ave, Pacific Grove California
Description: From ancient minds to Nobel-prize high-minded physics, astronauts to engineers, poetry has been a way to work things out, to make order of chaos, beauty of darkness, solace of pain, wisdom of the mess of feelings and ideas that blur our hassled, hectic everyday lives. This workshop is an introduction to the practical nature of poetry. We will raise our pens to the proposition that poetry can bring to the everyday mind one’s own remarkable capacity for problem-solving and coming up with new ways of thinking and creative solutions.

Dr. Mossberg has been a proponent of poetry and literature all her life in roles ranging from President of Goddard College, to the U.S. Scholar in Residence for the U. S. State Department as a cultural diplomat representing American culture, to Fulbright scholar, to senior scholar for the American Council on Education, to keynote speaker around the world on the humanities and creativity for leadership. Catch her weekly radio show, The Poetry Slow Down, on radio station, KRXA 540AM, (barbaramossberg.com).

Tea and pastries will be served.


The $15 workshop fee supports the Pacific Grove Poet in Residence fund.

Seating is limited, call Lisa Maddalena at 649-5760 or email LMaddale@pacificgrove.lib.ca.us for reservations.
Start Time: 09:00
Date: 2011-03-19
End Time: 12:00

ANTILAMENTATION: WHAT IS THE CONNECTION BETWEEN BROOKLYN AND ALASKA? JAPAN? PASADISE LOSTS: WE’VE GOT TO GET OURSELVES BACK TO THE GARDEN—Poetry’s squirrelly news of Loss and Love of This Loved and Lost and Found Earth and Its Creatures, continued, with voices of forgiveness, redemption, and hope!

Music:

Joni Mitchell ., Big Yellow Taxi (we’ve got to get ourselves back to the garden)

Jonathan Elias, Requiem for the Americas, Songs from the Lost World

Stephen Stills, Garden of Eden

Elvis Presley, Love Me Tender

You don’t think I would let you back into the fray, good friends, once more, without hope! Without a poet’s vision of the human spirit, how we can go on, suffering disasters of every kind, and desiring to somehow make of our experience every day something precious, as precious as this earth and its miracle of soil and regeneration, we who live, we who have died and am alive again today—e.e. cummings–, as we are so reminded in this strange time of year, middle March, gusty, feisty, balmy, wherever you live, it’s dynamic, and a lens through which to look at this life on this earth . . . this show has evolved today, as I have listened to the news, taking on its own momentum as I have thought of the role of poetry in the human spirit enduring loss of garden, of habitat, of life on earth, we’re going to conclude with a grand finale of Antilamentation, Dorianne Laux’s poem sent by listener Bobbi Ehrenpreis, followed by a Nobel Laureate in Literature who is the most famous person in the world, I think, for resistance to despair at life’s darkest moments, followed by a moving account of a decision through the lens of another anti-lamentian John Muir not to despair, Karen Bryant, one of my students at the Union Institute and University interdisciplinary doctoral program, and finally, wham pow beautiful fireworks, back in Brooklyn—our original Eden, garden, where we all end up, with a poem of hope written by our own listener Charles Tripi following our Brooklyn series, and I’m so fortunate to be on this journey with you, listeners of this poetry show, I wish you could meet each other! You are each so wonderful, HELOOOOO Gilbert! Master of the Amtrak station in Salinas, steps away from the John Steinbeck center, Gilbert, Who sold me my ticket the other morning and looked up as I spoke, you’re the poetry lady! I don’t know who was more excited to meet each other, he or me, and your letters and your comments make my day—so along with, Gilbert! Whoooo whooooo!!!!! All aboard! We’re on our way . . . We’ll be joined by Yeats and Wordsworth and Mary Oliver and Thrishana Pothupitiya and William Ernest Henley and Emily Dickinson and I’ll share with you some of my poetry and we’ll begin with your favorite of all, Rumi, 13th century Afghani poet writing from Turkey, as we are sent off by another listener of spirit, giving us a nut to squirrel away for dark and hard times, here’s what Elaine Buldoc sent:

Elaine Buldoc sends us Rumi, *”God will break your heart over and over and over and over and over again, until you can leave it open.” ~ Rumi .

Introductory words:

Dear March, come in! Slow down—breathe– . . . it’s middle March, and yes, we’re going to be talking about March like we do, like we like to do: “Dear March” was Emily Dickinson, greeting her dearest friend from the year, and this is Professor Barbara Mossberg, your host of KRXA 540AM’s The Poetry Slow Down, where you and I squirrel time in our day, from our week, save time by savoring time (do you know the dictionary says to squirrel means to hoard, and squirrely is a term meaning “offensive, “ that which is characteristic of squirrels?). Isn’t that the way? For something so wise from nature as a plucky animated determined model for preserving resources, stayin’ alive, a sustainable plan to draw from when everything seems bereft and nothing left and depleted—just when you need it—a nut, solace in a shell, that’s what we need today, with news for which, in T.S. Eliot’s words, we have to get squirrely, shore up against our ruins—what? Poems, O Poetry Slow Down flight of listeners! We hear the news, and for our hearts to take it all in, the heart-breaking, late-breaking, fast-breaking news, we need to squirrel away the vision poetry gives us, for our minds—neuroscience confirms this every day—to MARCH to the music of a different drummer than despair, in ways to make us healthy and wealthy in spirit and wise . . . .My heart is full as I share with you today another reason for leading off with Emily Dickinson, who is a celebrity disaster poet, a poet of external and interior seismic storms and cataclysms, who has this tremendous empathy and respect for nature, and the immensity of our loss and grief . . . huge grief to her is also experienced in particular, with each person, each ache: and she loved nature, and she often saw how humanity and nature are exquisitely in harmony, and in tragedy with great epic forces, and she is loved in Japan, and one of the members of our Emily Dickinson International Society, is missing; she was in Sendai, near to the river, which had a thirty foot wall of water –which you probably saw on tv filled with cars and houses and fires–descend on it; we are standing by with prayers and thoughts, and of course, like you, I am listening to the news . . . so our show today, which was going to be about the transition from Brooklyn, where I just have been—to Alaska, where I just came from—on the theme of paradise lost, we’ve got to get ourselves back to the garden, is . . . still going to be about the transition from Brookyn, East of Eden, we could say, to Alaska and Japan, on the theme of paradise lost, “we’ve got to get ourselves back to the garden”– Poetry of Loss of this Loved Earth and Its Creatures, continued, with voices of forgiveness, redemption, and hope! And the spirit to go on. . . . And poetry says, that’s what I’m talking about!

© Barbara Mossberg 2011