LIVE FROM THE 4 CHICKS CAFÉ and the Emily Dickinson International Society Annual Meeting

SLOW DOWN! YOU KNOW YOU MOVE TOO FAST

  • A VERY UNECLIPSE TO YOU FOR A YEAR AND LIFETIME OF AMAZEMENT
  • EVERYDAY WONDER Dazzling Poetry but You Don’t Need Glasses to Listen–
  • All-Us in Wonderland, or, It’s News to Me

 

One is constantly reminded of the infinite lavishness and fertility of Nature — inexhaustible abundance amid what seems enormous waste. And yet when we look into any of her operations that lie within reach of our minds, we learn that no particle of her material is wasted or worn out. It is eternally flowing from use to use, beauty to yet higher beauty; and we soon cease to lament waste and death, and rather rejoice and exult in the imperishable, unspendable wealth of the universe, and faithfully watch and wait the reappearance of everything that melts and fades and dies about us, feeling sure that its next appearance will be better and more beautiful than the last.
John Muir- My First Summer in the Sierra (1911) chapter 10.

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Rebroadcast: OLD DOGS: LEARNING LIFE TRICKS, GOOD NEWS, FROM THE POETS

From August 19, 2013:

Chuck Tripi’s poem
Janet’s poem Rumi she sent!

TODAY, like every other day, we wake up empty and frightened. Don’t open the door to the study and begin reading. Take down a musical instrument. Let the beauty we love be what we do. There are hundreds of ways to kneel and kiss the ground. The breeze at dawn has secrets to tell you. Don’t go back to sleep.

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Rebroadcast: WHEN IS IT EVER NOT ABOUT LEMON PIE — AND OTHER POETIC POIGNANCIES — RECIPE ADVICE FOR YOUR INNER KITCHEN

From August 30, 2015:

Advice & love letters we savor, letters we take literally to the table. . . from Pablo Neruda (a foodie) to Sandra Gilbert (a foodie), Emily Dickinson (a foodie) to Thomas Jefferson (a foodie), and many more. Music by Bob Hope, Mick Jagger, Trini Lopez, and Adele.
“Maybe it is the topic of food, because, to be truthful, don’t we love to think and read and hear (and write, I confess) about food? And maybe it is the idea that “you can’t go wrong here,” as I insist in my directions to making the dish. We cannot hear that enough. Because we feel we can go wrong every which way, early, late, often. So it seems that we need solace, to know that someone thinks the world of us. We need a fork in warm lemon pie, and a letter. This show is for you, then, O my cherished Character. Hear on.”


THE POETRY SLOW DOWN with Professor Barbara Mossberg (a foodie)
Produced by Zappa Johns
© Barbara Mossberg 2015

Rebroadcast: ALMOST AT TIMES, A FOOL—

From July 6, 2014:

ALMOST AT TIMES, A FOOL—
WE WISH . . . HUMANITARIAN CLOWNING:
THE WISE FOOL AND OTHER WISDOM ROLES

© Barbara Mossberg 2014

Rebroadcast: AND IN JULY A LEMONADE: A MEDITATION ON TRANSFORMATION BUTTERFLIES DO IT AND POETS DO IT TOO– WHAT POETRY MAKES OF LIFE’S LEMONS

From July 14, 2013:

To the coooool notes of the Beatles, “Hey Jude” (“better better better
better”), Frank Sinatra’s “I Wish You Love” (“and in July, a lemonade, to
cool you in the summer shade”), Simon and Garfunkle, “Bridge Over Troubled
Waters” (“like a bridge over troubled waters, I will lay you down”), and
Richard and Mimi Farina, “Pack Up Your Sorrows” (“you’ve got to pack up
your sorrows, and give them all to me, you would lose them, I know how to
use them”), we hear

AND IN JULY A LEMONADE:
A MEDITATION ON TRANSFORMATION
BUTTERFLIES DO IT AND POETS DO IT TOO–
WHAT POETRY MAKES OF LIFE’S LEMONS

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Rebroadcast: DUST UP AT TSUNAMI BOOKS

From July 20th, 2014:

COMMON GROUND AMONG FOUR POETS ON A RANDOM FRIDAY EVENING—THE THEME IS DUST AND WHY IT MATTERS TO YOU AND ME AND, IT SEEMS, POETS EVERYWHERE, EVERY TIME

Let’s slow down, you and I, when the evening is, let’s slow down and go then, and go to Innisfree, and let’s sweep out the dust in our minds, the dust from which we came and to which we go, the dust which we are, stars are, and poets know it, poets have always known it. Welcome to our Poetry Slow Down, RadioMonterey.com, podcast BarbaraMossberg.com, produced by Sara Hughes in our home studios, and I’m your host Professor Barbara Mossberg, bouncing and prancing around with the poetry scene up in, out West

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Rebroadcast: AN OXFORD-BASED POETRY SLOW DOWN

As Dr. B travels this week, we’re looking back on this episode from July 2015:

From 14th century Queen’s College, broadcast live for radiomonterey.com, produced by Zappa Johns, with Professor Barbara Mossberg, on the news we heed, the news we heed, the news “without which men die miserably every day” (William Carlos Williams, who knows whereof he speaks): poetry. We are investigating the phenomenon that what goes for “new” (and news) and genius is an amalgam and collision of old and older and older again, different ways of knowing and expressing from the past and other disciplines. Thus we find ourselves with Oxford exemplars, who each study Latin and Greek and arts and sciences, from STEMers Sir Christopher Wren reading The Aeneidand Lewis Carroll reading Oxford poetry to T. S. Eliot and the new Oxford laureate Simon Armitage, who, naturally, are engaging classical worlds and The Odyssey. We consider Joyce Cary’s The Horse’s Mouth covering William Blake, and Nancy Willard covering Blake, and David Lehman covering Wordsworth (who was an honorary at Oxford). Features of our show this week include the theory that the architecture of Wren’s St. Paul’s Cathedral and Eliot’s “The Wasteland” are the same “new” breaking-away works of genius and beauty, jazz, chaos (theory), and colliding amalgamation, that make today’s headliner Armitage seem positively . . . in the company of ancients, as Wordsworth would have us have it:

Where holy ground begins, unhallowed ends,

Is marked by no distinguishable line;

The turf unites, the pathways intertwine;

And, wheresoe’er the stealing footstep tends,

Garden, and that domain where kindred, friends,

And neighbours rest together, here confound

Their several features, mingled like the sound

Of many waters, or as evening blends

With shady night. Soft airs, from shrub and flower,

Waft fragrant greetings to each silent grave;

And while those lofty poplars gently wave

Their tops, between them comes and goes a sky

Bright as the glimpses of eternity,

To saints accorded in their mortal hour. William Wordsworth

Wordsworth is speaking of joy, which Blake makes “poetic,” and that joy from the beauty of poetry is something incandescent. Thank you for listening, in whatever time zone (our listeners span 15 time zones), and for the joy, as it flies . . . . (thank you Mr. Blake).

© Barbara Mossberg 2015